Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020
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Nightingale Comes Home: An Interdisciplinary Investigation

This AHRC-funded research project will produce a more complex historical and literary understanding of Florence Nightingale by mapping her family and home connections to Derbyshire, and analysing how her regional experiences impacted her career, attitudes, and writings.

A joint venture between the School of Health Sciences and the Department of History, the project also investigates what Nightingale's life and work reveals about the health history and cultural life of the Victorian Midlands. It is timed to coincide with national celebrations of Nightingale's bicentenary in 2020. 

Click the links to the left or below to explore more about our work - and gain unprecedented virtual access to Nightingale's Derbyshire home by following our panoramic tour of Lea Hurst.

Click here to download Nightingale-themed driving and walking tours of the area around Lea Hurst. 

And click here to get involved or join our mailing list! 

Arts and Humanities Research Council

This project is supported by AHRC grant no. AH/R00014X/1
 
 
 
 
 

At Home with the Nightingales

Step inside Lea Hurst, Florence Nightingale's home in Derbyshire
 

 

Latest Announcements

“Families coming into hospital are guests in our house, and we should make them welcome”: An interview with Dame Elizabeth Fradd

Dame Elizabeth Fradd is one of the UK’s foremost nursing administrators, and was vice-chair of the University of Nottingham Council from 2012-18. She has variously served as Assistant Chief Nursing Officer (Nursing Practice) for the Department of Health, Director of Nursing and Education in the West Midlands Regional Office, and Nurse Director and lead Director for ...

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The Aqueduct Cottage

Our first guest blog post comes from Ron Common, a Derbyshire resident who has volunteered in the area around Florence Nightingale’s home as a DerwentWISE Cultural Heritage Volunteer. Ron has been championing the case for an abandoned building standing on what is known as the ‘Nightingale Branch’ of the Cromford Canal. You can find out more ...

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Locating Health workshop Jan 11 – programme announced!

The programme for the Locating Health workshop at the University of Nottingham (Humanities Building) is now live. It can be viewed via this link to the workshop webpage. The workshop is open to all and registration is free – as is the lunch and wine reception if those tempt you! If you wish to attend, ...

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Paul Crawford’s piece for The Conversation

Here’s a link to a piece published by Professor Paul Crawford, who heads the current Nightingale project, a few years back. It shows how Nightingale’s compassionate and humanist approach to healthcare is in danger of being lost in today’s fixation on metrics, targets and production-line methodologies. https://theconversation.com/florence-nightingale-carried-the-lamp-but-modern-nurses-carry-the-can-25114

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Welcome to the Nightingale Comes Home Project Blog

Welcome to our project blog! We will use this blog to reflect on some of our research activities and findings, as well as to announce project news. To find out more about our project, please visit the project website. We welcome guest blogs on topics related to Nightingale and nursing, health, industrial and cultural history in Derbyshire and ...

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Leading image: 'Florence Nightingale', background extended of photograph by William Edward Kilburn, c. 1856. This image is released by the National Portrait Gallery under a Creative Commons licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020
Email: nightingale2020@nottingham.ac.uk