Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020
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Nightingale Comes Home: An Interdisciplinary Investigation

This AHRC-funded research project will produce a more complex historical and literary understanding of Florence Nightingale by mapping her family and home connections to Derbyshire, and analysing how her regional experiences impacted her career, attitudes, and writings.

A joint venture between the School of Health Sciences and the Department of History, the project also investigates what Nightingale's life and work reveals about the health history and cultural life of the Victorian Midlands. It is timed to coincide with national celebrations of Nightingale's bicentenary in 2020. 

Click the links to the left or below to explore more about our work - and gain unprecedented virtual access to Nightingale's Derbyshire home by following our panoramic tour of Lea Hurst.

Our project blog is regularly updated with news and research content - please take a look and subscribe for updates!

Click here to download Nightingale-themed driving and walking tours of the area around Lea Hurst. 

And click here to get involved or join our mailing list! 

Arts and Humanities Research Council

This project is supported by AHRC grant no. AH/R00014X/1

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At Home with the Nightingales

Step inside Lea Hurst, Florence Nightingale's home in Derbyshire
 

 

Latest Announcements

New workshop – ‘The Home in Modern History and Culture’ – 27 Jan 2020

The project team is pleased to be able to confirm the date of Monday 27 January 2020 for our second academic workshop, to be held at the University of Nottingham, Council Room, Trent Building. This workshop, the second in our series of three, explores the theme of Home and its applicability as a prism through ...

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Finding Florence Nightingale Across the Atlantic – by Steph Meek

Steph Meek, an AHRC-funded PhD Researcher at the Universities of Exeter and Reading, recently discovered two previously unknown letters by Florence Nightingale during a research visit to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In the post below Steph explains how the letters shed light on the Victorian lending libraries to which Nightingale subscribed on behalf ...

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In Pursuit of Nightingale – by Katharine McMahon

Katharine McMahon is the latest guest contributor to our blog. Katharine’s novel The Rose of Sebastopol follows a thwarted disciple of Nightingale, Rosa, through her trials in the Crimea. It was selected for the Richard & Judy Book Club in 2008 and went on to become an international bestseller.  In this post, Katharine recalls her ...

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Periodic Wallpaper

Our project is featured in the latest issue of the University of Nottingham magazine Vision, which marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table of Elements. It was Nottingham’s Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff that helped inspire the worldwide recognition of this landmark in the history of science. The issue features a range of projects from ...

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The First BME Nurse in the NHS – by Professor Lynn McDonald

In our latest guest blog, Professor Lynn McDonald, editor of the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale and co-founder of the Nightingale Society, outlines the little-known story of Kofoworola Abeni Pratt, the first black nurse to work in the NHS. Mrs “Rola” Pratt was an outstanding nursing leader. When the Windrush Empire arrived in the U.K. in ...

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Leading image: 'Florence Nightingale', background extended of photograph by William Edward Kilburn, c. 1856. This image is released by the National Portrait Gallery under a Creative Commons licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020
Email: nightingale2020@nottingham.ac.uk