Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020
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Blogs and Announcement

Our blog is run by the postdoctoral researchers on the project, Dr Jonathan Memel and Dr Richard Bates. 

Read the Nightingale Comes Home blog

Hosted by University of Nottingham Blogs, we will use it to announce project news and reflect on some of our research activities and findings. See the 'research blogs' below for recent examples. 

We welcome guest blogs on topics related to Nightingale and nursing, health, industrial and cultural history in Derbyshire and the wider East Midlands. If you'd like to write such a post, please get in touch.

We are particularly keen to hear from Citizen Researchers, i.e. non-academics investigating topics relating to NIghtingale. If that sounds like you, tell us!

Research Blogs

'William Nightingale's Domesday Book'

'The Suitor and the Sister'

Wellcome_Field_Ambulance

'Field Ambulance Used by Florence Nightingale'. Photograph, n.d. Wellcome Collection, Creative Commons licence  CC BY 4.0.

 

 

Latest Announcements

“Families coming into hospital are guests in our house, and we should make them welcome”: An interview with Dame Elizabeth Fradd

Dame Elizabeth Fradd is one of the UK’s foremost nursing administrators, and was vice-chair of the University of Nottingham Council from 2012-18. She has variously served as Assistant Chief Nursing Officer (Nursing Practice) for the Department of Health, Director of Nursing and Education in the West Midlands Regional Office, and Nurse Director and lead Director for ...

The post “Families coming into hospital are guests in our house, and we should make them welcome”: An interview with Dame Elizabeth Fradd appeared first on Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020.

The Aqueduct Cottage

Our first guest blog post comes from Ron Common, a Derbyshire resident who has volunteered in the area around Florence Nightingale’s home as a DerwentWISE Cultural Heritage Volunteer. Ron has been championing the case for an abandoned building standing on what is known as the ‘Nightingale Branch’ of the Cromford Canal. You can find out more ...

The post The Aqueduct Cottage appeared first on Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020.

Locating Health workshop Jan 11 – programme announced!

The programme for the Locating Health workshop at the University of Nottingham (Humanities Building) is now live. It can be viewed via this link to the workshop webpage. The workshop is open to all and registration is free – as is the lunch and wine reception if those tempt you! If you wish to attend, ...

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Paul Crawford’s piece for The Conversation

Here’s a link to a piece published by Professor Paul Crawford, who heads the current Nightingale project, a few years back. It shows how Nightingale’s compassionate and humanist approach to healthcare is in danger of being lost in today’s fixation on metrics, targets and production-line methodologies. https://theconversation.com/florence-nightingale-carried-the-lamp-but-modern-nurses-carry-the-can-25114

The post Paul Crawford’s piece for The Conversation appeared first on Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020.

Welcome to the Nightingale Comes Home Project Blog

Welcome to our project blog! We will use this blog to reflect on some of our research activities and findings, as well as to announce project news. To find out more about our project, please visit the project website. We welcome guest blogs on topics related to Nightingale and nursing, health, industrial and cultural history in Derbyshire and ...

The post Welcome to the Nightingale Comes Home Project Blog appeared first on Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020.

 

Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020
Email: nightingale2020@nottingham.ac.uk